Monthly Archives: February 2015

Writing Prompt #3

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writing painting

Play a game of Clue with your friends. Write a story of about what happens in the game.

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Holy Cow by David Duchovny – Book Review

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“Most people think cows can’t think. Hello. Let me rephrase that, most people think cows can’t think, and have no feelings. Hello, again. I’m a cow, my name is Elsie, yes, I know. And that’s no bull.”

And so begins the most bizarre, hilarious, nonsensical book I’ve ever read in my life. I gotta say, when I picked up this book, I knew nothing about it. All I knew was that my dear David Duchovny wrote it (with some help, I’m assuming), and it had to do with a cow. I think that is all one has to know before reading it.

I’ve always been fascinated by books with the POV of an animal, so I went into it expecting a humorous version of Animal Farm. Although the novel was mentioned in Holy Cow, it really had no similarities.

From the start, I was laughing, and that had to be a good sign. Elsie is a happily oblivious cow living on a farm. She’s a curious, smart cow, and she wants more from life than what she knows will come. So, when Elsie discovers the truth about her future on the farm (i.e. slaughterhouse) she decides to take off to the other side of the world.

I couldn’t help but loving Elsie. She was really opinionated and wise about all things. She was so critical about humanity, and I really liked that. I agreed with her confusion about human behavior. But like all animal books, Elsie wasn’t the only perky character here. We also had a pig named Jerry, who later renamed himself Shalom, and a turkey named Tom Turkey, who just really wanted to fly. I loved all three of these characters.

Having said that, the story was extremely unrealistic, but it didn’t bother me in the slightest. I wasn’t in it for a non-fiction tale about farm animals, I was in it for…well, the funny. And I got the funny. I loved Elsie’s voice throughout. I’m not sure her ending message was clear to me, but I still enjoyed her.

Now, I really don’t know if Duchovny wrote this entirely on his own or with help, but I couldn’t give a damn. This book was lovely. It was by no means perfect, but it was worth reading. So, if you want funny, pick this up and you’ll get hours of laughter.

(can we appreciate my beautiful Duchovny with reading glasses, though? I promise my review was not biased by my love of one of my favorite actors and people in the world).

Writing Playlist #4- Mental Health

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The Smiths- Asleep

Don’t try to wake me in the morning/’Cause I will be gone/Don’t feel bad for me/I want you to know/Deep in the cell of my heart/I will feel so glad to go

Seether- Plastic Man

Why don’t you let me be/And I’ll pretend I’m well/Cause your too blind to see/And I’m too tired to tell

Sia- Breathe Me

Help, I have done it again/I have been here many times before/Hurt myself again today/And the worst part is there’s no one else to blame

Blue October- Hate Me

You made me compliment myself when it was way too hard to take/So I’ll drive so fucking far away that I never cross your mind/And do whatever it takes in your heart to leave me behind

Fall Out Boy- 7 Minutes in Heaven

The only thing worse than not knowing/Is you thinking I don’t know/I’m just having another episode/I just need a stronger dose

Papa Roach- Scars

My weakness is that I care too much/And my scars remind me that the past is real/I tear my heart open just to feel

Plumb- Cut

I’m tired of feeling so numb/Relief exists I find it when/I am cut

Starset- My Demons

I cannot stop this sickness taking over/It takes control and drags me into nowhere

Saliva- Lost

Endless fight and I am the enemy/Save me from what I’ve become/I’ve awaken but I don’t know how I’m alive

Sia- Chandelier

Party girls don’t get hurt/Can’t feel anything/When will I learn/I push it down, push it down

Marina & the Diamonds- Teen Idle

I wanna drink until I ache/ I wanna make a big mistake/I want blood, guts, and angel cake/I’m gonna puke it anyway

Matchbox 20- Unwell

Hold on/ Feeling like I’m headed for a breakdown/And I don’t know why/But I’m not crazy

Gorilla Zoe- Lost

I’m losing my mind/Losing control of the wheel/And I’m serving/On and off the road

Green Day- Basket Case

Sometimes I give myself the creeps/Sometimes my mind plays tricks on me/It all keeps adding up/I think I’m cracking up

Three Days Grace- Never Too Late

Even if I say/It’ll be alright/Still I hear you say/You want to end your life

Book Review- A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

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I’ve never heard anything bad about this book before. It was always called a favorite book, life changing, a must read, so when I spotted it at book sale I knew I had to pick it up. I must say it did not live up to the hype. Not to say it was badly written. It was written very well. I felt completely submerged in the world that Burgess created. The invented slang was equally amazing as it was annoying. I like how it was written. What was written, well, that’s another thing.

As a reader, you weren’t supposed to like Alex. He was a horrible person. I didn’t connect with him at all, thankfully, but that made it hard to read. For me, characters are really important for my reading experience. So getting through this was tough. Then, there was the violence. I didn’t think it would bother me. I can watch crime shows all day long, and not be bothered. But reading it was another thing entirely. I felt like I got brainwashed along with Alex, and after I finished the book I avoided any kind of violence for a while.

The question the book brings up about being good and the freedom of choice is an interesting one. I have to say, however, that I wasn’t interested in answering it or thinking about it after finishing the book. What do I care about what happened to Alex? Even when not talking about him in particular. Anything to do with that debate reminds me of him so it leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

Gives Light by Rose Christo – Book Review

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I found this book to be quite calming and soothing. I’m not entirely sure why, but it brought a sense of comfort to me.

This story follows a boy named Skylar. His dad’s been missing so he contacts the police and eventually he gets sent to an Indian Reservation under the care of his grandmother. Skylar is mute due to a tragic incident he suffered at a young age, where his mother was murdered. Skylar’s father is Shoshone, while his mother is caucasian, and Skylar resembles his mother more than his father. He’s caught in the middle of a culture he knows very little of, but he soon learns to become a part of his community.

To me, Gives Light was a challenging book. It challenged me to consider Skylar’s situation, having known his mother’s killer, and then meeting his son. Immediately I sensed an issue. A really big issue. How can you befriend this boy? He’s the son of your mother’s killer. Yes, but what does that mean? By default does that make him guilty as well? But this situation could easily be symbolic of much larger issues. Some cultures form an automatic hatred, blaming an entire culture because their ancestors hurt their ancestors. It seems reasonable, right? Normal even. To carry on that hatred from generation to generation.

There’s so much to think about, to consider, when it comes to this story. Skylar and Rafael had the best friendship/romance I have read about. Although it could have been complicated, it wasn’t. It was easy to read about, to digest. They were just two boys who had accepted each other, not for their appearances or ancestors or backgrounds, but for their souls. Maybe I sound like a sap, but that’s what it felt to me.

I will never understand the pain of many Native Americans that live with the constant tragedy of their past. Guilty consciences can only repair so much. But I really think that there is room for acceptance. In all of us. Not just regarding this story, but real life issues. We are so quick to hate. Hate comes so easily. There is more to a person than their ethnicity, their race, their parents. We are born into these things. What matters is who we choose to be.